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stress

3 Doors of Wisdom

Visualisation is a powerful tool for beating stress.

It’s often the lack of ability to visualise (or imagine) yourself having a great life that gets in the way of you achieving your dreams.

This week, I’ll help you to get a step closer to getting what you want by taking you through an exercise called 3 doors of wisdom.

The first door is there to help you to remove obstacles that stand between you and your goal.

The second door hides all your inner resources.

The third door reveals a future version of you who can tell you how best to get unstuck.

This is the sort of exercises that we do in my self-hypnosis masterclass. It never fails to produce instant results and insights.

I hope you enjoy the video. Please feel free to share.

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Uncategorized

How Wabi Sabi can make you a better problem solver

Wabi Sabi is a Japanese concept which makes you appreciate and find beauty in imperfection.

It is not to be confused with Japanese horseradish 😂

In my last video, I gave you the first step that my coaching clients undertake when they do problem solving therapy to combat stress: problem identification and formulation.

The next step is to brainstorm possible solutions.

However, before you proceed to this stage, I recommend that you take a Wabi Sabi walk.

Please watch this short video to learn more (Duration 4:36 min. Hit CC for subtitles)

If you know of a team who could benefit from learning more about problem solving therapy as a way to build resilience and safeguard mental health, please contact me on info@nordiquetouch.co.uk.

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stress

Beat stress with problem solving therapy

The stressed brain is rubbish at solving problems.

It doesn’t help that we very often rush into making changes without having spent enough time on identifying all the aspects of the issue.

Today, I’d like to share with you a story of what happens when you try to solve the wrong problem.

And then I’ll introduce you to the very first part of problem solving therapy:

Problem identification and Formulation.

This part is made up of 5 steps.

I invite you to reflect on which step you may be most likely to miss out when you do problem solving on your own.

For me, it’s step 5. I definitely have a tendency to rush into problem solving without having thought carefully about likely obstacles.

However, by following the structure of problem solving therapy, I’m improving my skills daily and I’m definitely experiencing less stress as a result.

I am convinced that this technique can work for you too.

Enjoy the video

(Duration 4:07 minutes. Hit CC for subtitles)

If you know of a team who could benefit from learning more about problem solving therapy as a way to build resilience and safeguard mental health, please contact me.